Wednesday, February 19, 2014

The Nadi Workshop


The CITES workshop hosted by Fiji, The Pew Charitable Trusts, and the Coral Reef Alliance in Nadi, Fiji last week was very successful.  Here is some of the media surrounding the two day workshop:

Pacific Countries Prepare to Enforce Historic Shark Protections
In seven months, more than 170 countries will start enforcing trade protections to help save several shark species from extinction. Next week, preparation in the Pacific region begins in earnest.
On Feb. 11 and 12, government representatives from 11 countries will gather in Nadi, Fiji, to discuss the implementation of international shark protections approved under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, or CITES. The workshop is hosted by the Fijian government, The Pew Charitable Trusts, and the Coral Reef Alliance.
11 Countries to Talk Shark Conservation
FIJI will next week play host to one of the most important shark conservation forums this year, with reps from 11 countries from around the region expected to gather in Nadi to discuss protection measures.
Restoring Shark Populations in the South Pacific
FIJI will play a key role in restoring shark populations in the South Pacific.
This was one of the messages from a manager at Pew Charitable Trusts, Angelo Villagomez, who said Fiji, as a party to the Convention on the International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), would be an important part of a shark conservation conference which begins today in Nadi.
"This meeting, sponsored by the Department of Environment, Pew, and the Coral Reef Alliance, will help the Pacific parties to the CITES convention, including Fiji, implement the new protections for oceanic whitetip and three species of hammerhead sharks," Mr Villagomez explained yesterday.
Shark Fin Trade Under Spotlight
CUSTOMS officers on the frontline of border security can now play a major part in the banning of imports and exports of shark fins.
Assistant professor for New York-based Stony Brook University Dr Demian Chapman, who is in the country for a shark conservation workshop in Nadi, will train Customs officers on correctly identifying shark fins.
New Shark Trade Regulation
A NEW rule coming into effect on September 14 this year will require all countries to regulate the trade of sharks. This will allow for better protection of sharks worldwide, particularly those on the endangered list.
Conference in Fiji prepares to introduce new shark protection laws
Conservationists throughout the Pacific are hoping to strike a significant blow to the global trade in shark fin.
Fisheries officials and non-goverment organisation's throughout the Pacific are in Fiji preparing to introduce historic new measures to preserve shark numbers.
New Shark Trade Regulation
A new rule coming into effect on September 14 this year will require all countries to regulate the trade of sharks.
This will allow for better protection of sharks worldwide, particularly those on the endangered list.
Imogen Zethoven, the global shark conservation project director with Pew Charitable Trust, said the new rule was being implemented at a critical time.
Speaking at a shark conservation workshop in Nadi on Tuesday, she said not many rules had been put in place by countries worldwide regarding shark conservation.
“This is the problem and why we are seeing such a decline in the shark populations," she said.

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