Friday, March 1, 2013

Global catches, exploitation rates, and rebuilding options for sharks

While we were on the plane to Bangkok, Marine Policy published a new peer-reviewed study, Global catches, exploitation rates, and rebuilding options for sharks by Boris Worm and several other prominent shark scientists. The study estimates that the number of sharks killed each year is much higher than previously thought.

From Oceans Inc:
Pew calls for action at CITES to prevent species from being traded to extinction. According to scientific findings released today in the peer-reviewed journal Marine Policy, the number of sharks killed each year in commercial fisheries is estimated at 100 million, with a range between 63 million and 273 million. The authors also warn that the rate of fishing for shark species, many of which grow slowly and reproduce late in life, exceeds their ability to recover.

This is only the second study in existence that estimates the number of sharks killed each year. The first study was published in 2006 by Shelley Clarke. That study used Hong Kong trade data to determine the number of sharks "killed for the fin trade." The new study is more comprehensive.

No comments:

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...