Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Photography: The Language of Conservation

"Sharks are in many ways a symbol of the ocean. Exceptionally mysterious, powerful, unknown, frightening and of course beautiful. They run through the human psyche and run through our lives."
--David Doubilet 

David Doubilet at Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
On February 15th, the Shark Stanley team from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental studies held an interdisciplinary symposium on shark and marine conservation. This is the first of eight SharkTalks from the event.

"Photography: The Language of Conservation" features David Doubilet, one of the world's most celebrated underwater photographers. Since his first assignment in 1971 Doubilet has become one the most published photographers in the history of the National Geographic Magazine. Doubilet has spent five decades descending beneath the surface in the far corners of the world from interior Africa, equatorial coral reefs, and rich temperate seas to beneath the polar ice. He believes photography is a language that creates a visual voice for the oceans and connects us to the beauty and silent devastation happening within the invisible world below. Doubilet serves as contributing editor for several publications and is an author of twelve titles, including the award-wining Water Light Time, and his photographic awards include numerous Picture of the Year, BBC Wildlife, Communication Arts and World Press awards.

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